HMCS/M GRILSE

The GRILSE (SS-71) is the former United States Navy Submarine USS BURRFISH (SSR 312). She was loaned to Canada for five years and returned at that time. The GRILSE was commissioned into the RCN at Groton, Connecticut, 11 May 1961. The Submarine was originally commissioned on 13 September 1943 and conducted 6 War Patrols during World War II. After American and Canadian service she was sunk off San Clemente as a target on 19 November 1969

gri2
Commissioned Date:
11 May 1961
Sunk off San Clemente as a target on 19 November 1969 gri1

 

HMCS/M RAINBOW

The RAINBOW is the former United States Navy Submarine USS ARGONAUT (SS475), originally commissioned on the 15 January 1945. The ARGONAUT only conducted 1 war patrol during World War Two. On 2 December 1968, at Norfolk, Virginia she was transferred to the Canadian Navy and became HMCS RAINBOW (SS-75). The RAINBOW remained on the West Coast of Canada and conducted numerous exercises. On the 31 December, 1975 she was decommissioned and returned to the United States.

rai2
 
Commissioned Date:
2/12/68
Decommissioned Date:
31/12/1975
rai1

 

OBERON Class Patrol Submarines

After much ‘politicking’ and to the intense frustration of a few caring naval officers, in November of 1963, three OBERON class patrol submarines were purchased from Britain to replace older submarines borrowed from the US Navy. At the time, they were state of the art conventional subs, despite being based on a late-WWII German hull design. They were originally fitted with two stern-facing 'short' torpedo tubes, but the advent of reliable guided torpedos made these obsolete. In the early- to mid- 1980's, all three subs went through SOUP (Submarine Operational Update Program) refits, which updated various systems, including the sonar and the torpedos carried. A fourth O-boat (OLYMPUS) was later purchased (used) from the RN, to be used alongside for training purposes, and a fifth (HMS OSIRIS) was purchased and used for spare parts. One submarine was often kept in refit at any given time.  OKANAGAN's sailpast was delayed by the crash of Swissair Flight 111, and she was employed in searching for and finding the flight recorders from that plane.

oji1 HMCS/M OJIBWA
Commissioned Date:
23/09/65
Decommissioned Date:
May 1998

Final Resting Place

http://www.hmcsojibwa.ca/

oji2
     
ono1 HMCS/M ONONDAGA
Commissioned Date:
22/06/67
Decommissioned Date:
28 July 2000

Final Resting Place

http://www.navalreview.ca/wp-content/uploads/public/vol7num2/vol7num2art4.pdf

WEBSITE : http://shmp.qc.ca/
oka2
     
oka1 HMCS/M OKANAGAN
Commissioned Date:
22/06/68
Decommissioned Date:
14 Sept. 98
Final Resting Place
 

 

ono2

 Victoria-Class Submarines

Victoria-class submarines represent the Royal Canadian Navy’s key contribution to Canada’s deployable strategic military assets. The fleet of the Canadian Submarine Force has been operating in its normal cycle of readiness since early 2015. HMCS Windsor, Victoria, and Chicoutimi are currently in their operational cycle in various states of preparedness. HMCS Corner Brook is currently docked at Victoria Shipyards to undergo its Extended Docking Work Period (EDWP) under the Victoria In-service Support Contract with Babcock Canada Inc. It is scheduled to remain in EDWP until 2018. Canadian submarines generally operate in an operational cycle in which each vessel is available to the fleet for six years – referred to as the “operational period” – followed by two years in deep maintenance during an EDWP. Submarines are among the world’s most highly complex machines and they operate in an unforgiving environment. This necessitates a highly rigorous material certification process to assure the safety of the crew and the submarine. This material certification is achieved through a time-based maintenance cycle which forms an essential element of the operational cycle of any class of submarine. In 2008, Canada’s Treasury Board approved the expenditure of up to a maximum of $1.5 billion over a period of up to 15 years for the in-service support for the Victoria-class submarines. The Victoria In-Service Support Contract (VISSC) was awarded competitively to the Canadian Submarine Management Group, now renamed Babcock Canada Inc. All Victoria-class Extended Docking Work Periods performed during the term of this contract, commencing with HMCS Chicoutimi, are funded and managed through the VISSC. In June 2013, the Government of Canada exercised the first five-year extension option of this maintenance support contract, worth $531 million. This contract highlights a key strategic knowledge sharing initiative and partnership between the RCN and Canadian industry. Canadian submarines are used to conduct various missions, including counter-terrorism, support to Special Operation Forces and perform constabulary roles in support of RCMP anti-narcotic operations, Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ patrols, and illegal immigration interdiction operations.

HMCS Windsor

HMCS Windsor Crest

HMCS Windsor is a long-range hunter-killer (SSK) submarine of the Royal Canadian Navy, the second submarine of the Victoria class. She is named after the city of Windsor, Ontario. Built for the Royal Navy as the Upholder-class submarine HMS Unicorn (pennant number S43) she was purchased by Canada when the United Kingdom decided to move to an all-nuclear power fleet.

HMCS Windsor deployed for Exercises JOINT WARRIOR and TRIDENT JUNCTURE where it operated alongside NATO partners during the fall of 2015. The submarine also participated in joint training with Canadian Special Operations Forces personnel. These exercises enhanced the combat readiness of all units involved, improved interoperability and confirmed operational mission preparedness. The participation of Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) assets in exercises such as these enhances the Navy’s ability to operate with our NATO Allies and contributes to solutions in an evolving, and challenging, global security environment.

Windsor now holds a record 101 days for the longest deployment for the Victoria Class since the submarine returned from JOINT WARRIOR and TRIDENT JUNCTURE in December 2015. Windsor was last docked in 2014 and received a number of upgrades, including a state-of-the-art bow sonar system that wasn’t originally scheduled to go in until 2016. The new sonar system will bring the entire sonar suite of the Victoria Class forward – from 1980s technology into the 21st century – in order to continue to act on behalf of Canada in the face of emerging maritime threats.

HMCS Windsor Specs

Class and type: Upholder/Victoria-class submarine
Displacement:
2,185 long tons (2,220 t) surfaced
2,400 long tons (2,439 t) submerged
Length: 70.26 m (230 ft 6 in)
Beam: 7.6 m (24 ft 11 in)
Draught: 5.5 m (18 ft 1 in)
Propulsion:
Diesel-electric (37 MW (50,000 hp))
2 Paxman Valenta 16 RPA diesel generators, 4,070 hp (3,030 kW)
2 GEC, 5,000 kW (6,700 hp) motor-generators
Speed:
12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) surfaced
20 kn (23 mph; 37 km/h)+ submerged
Range: 10,000 nautical miles (19,000 km) at 12 knots (22 km/h)
Test depth: 200 m (660 ft)
Complement: 53 officers and crew
Armament:
6 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes
18 × Mark 48 torpedoes
"From Wikipedia"

HMCS Victoria

HMCS Victoria Crest

HMCS Victoria is a long-range hunter-killer (SSK) submarine of the Royal Canadian Navy, the lead ship of her class. She is named after the city of Victoria, British Columbia. She was purchased from the Royal Navy, and is the former HMS Unseen (S41). The class was also renamed from the Upholder class. HMCS Victoria was busy in 2014 and early 2015 conducting force generation operations. It has been the busiest submarine of the fleet after it was declared fully operational in 2012. Since that time, the submarine has participated in various advanced international exercises such as the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC), revealing the modern and unique capabilities of the Victoria-class submarine while providing anti-submarine training for Canadian and international maritime vessels. As part of RIMPAC 2012, HMCS Victoria was the first of its class to fire the RCN Mk48 torpedo, sinking the decommissioned United States Naval Ship ex-USNS Concord. This clearly demonstrated the lethality of Victoria-class submarines. Victoria worked with Special Forces during JOINT Exercise 2013 and other binational continental defence exercises and also participated in operations on behalf of Canada. In September 2014, Victoria’s crew received the Operational Service Medal for their successful participation in Operation CARIBBE, a US-led, multinational effort to interdict drug trafficking in the waters of the Caribbean Basin and the Eastern Pacific.

Navy News / July 19, 2012

A live fire exercise was conducted by HMCS Victoria where the submarine demonstrated its weapons capability. Victoria successfully fired a MK48 Heavyweight Torpedo on a decommissioned ship in the weapons testing range near the island of Kauai, Hawaii during the RIMPAC exercise.




HMCS Victoria Specs

Class and type: Upholder/Victoria-class submarine
Displacement:
2,185 long tons (2,220 t) surfaced
2,400 long tons (2,439 t) submerged
Length: 70.26 m (230 ft 6 in)
Beam: 7.6 m (24 ft 11 in)
Draught: 5.5 m (18 ft 1 in)
Propulsion:
Diesel-electric (37 MW (50,000 hp))
2 Paxman Valenta 16 RPA diesel generators, 4,070 hp (3,030 kW)
2 GEC, 5,000 kW (6,700 hp) motor-generators
Speed:
12 knots (14 mph; 22 km/h) surfaced
20 kn (23 mph; 37 km/h)+ submerged
Range: 10,000 nautical miles (19,000 km) at 12 knots (22 km/h)
Test depth: 200 m (660 ft)
Complement: 53 officers and crew
Armament:
6 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes
18 × Mark 48 torpedoes





The former USNS Concord was used as a target vessel for Her Majesty's Canadian Ship (HMCS) Victoria (SSK 876) during a sinking exercise (SINKEX) at the Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, in Kauai County, Hawaii, on July 17 2012.
The MK48 torpedo launched by HMCS Victoria scored a direct hit, and the target vessel sank in less than 18 minutes.



HMCS Chicoutimi

HMCS Chicoutimi Crest


HMCS Chicoutimi is a Victoria-class long-range hunter-killer (SSK) submarine of the Royal Canadian Navy.  Shortly after being handed over by the United Kingdom to Canada she was involved in a partial flooding incident which resulted in a fire at sea. The incident sparked a fierce debate over the value of the purchase of this group of second-hand vessels, as well as the handover inspection process. The accident was determined to have been caused by Royal Canadian Navy personnel's failure to follow operational procedures.The boat was officially commissioned into the Royal Canadian Navy on 3 September 2015.
HMCS Chicoutimi has been busy training submariners. Like HMCS Windsor, the submarine was at sea participating in an international exercise during the fall of 2015. Chicoutimi, accompanied HMCS Calgary and HMCS Vancouver during a United States Navy task group exercise of the California coast. The series of events was led by the Expeditionary Strike Group 3 Commander and included an amphibious squadron, an amphibious assault ship, an amphibious transport dock ship and a dock landing ship.

Although the submarine returned to sea in late 2014 and was busy throughout 2015, HMCS Chicoutimi was officially commissioned into
the RCN fleet during a formal ceremony in Esquimalt on
September 3, 2015. Commissioning is the formal and ceremonial
act of placing a ship or submarine in active service.

HMCS Chicoutimi completed its EDWP and returned to the RCN fleet in December 2014. The submarine was taken out of service following a tragic fire onboard in October 2004. This was the first EDWP conducted by industry under the Victoria In-service Support Contract.






 1."HMCS Chicoutimi Incident- Board of Inquiry". Archived from the original on 2009-12-13.

HMCS Chicoutimi Specs

Class and type: Upholder/Victoria-class submarine
Displacement:
2,260 long tons (2,296 t) surfaced
2,500 long tons (2,540 t) submerged
Length: 230 ft 7 in (70.28 m)
Beam: 23 ft 7 in (7.19 m)
Draught: 24 ft 11 in (7.59 m)
Speed:
12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) surfaced
20 kn (23 mph; 37 km/h) submerged
Complement: 48 officers and crew, plus 7 trainees
Armament:
6 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes
18 × Mark 48 torpedoes




1."From Wikipedia"

HMCS/M CORNER BROOK

HMCS CORNER BROOK Crest

HMCS Corner Brook is a long-range hunter-killer submarine (SSK) of the Royal Canadian Navy. She is the former Royal Navy Upholder-class submarine HMS Ursula (S42), purchased from the British at the end of the Cold War. She is the third boat of the Victoria class and is named after the city of Corner Brook, Newfoundland.

HMCS Corner Brook is docked at Victoria Shipyards Co. Ltd., in Esquimalt, B.C. to undergo its EDWP under the Victoria In-service Support Contract with Babcock Canada Inc. It is scheduled to remain in EDWP until 2018.

HMCS Corner Brook has participated in various NATO and Canada/U.S. exercises, where it received high praise for its contribution as a simulated enemy in order to assist in the training of NATO and U.S. surface and air forces. Corner Brook deployed to the Arctic in support of Operation NANOOK in August 2007 and again in August 2009, where it participated in a counter-narcotics exercise and conducted covert surveillance patrols in the vicinity of Baffin Island. In March 2008 and again in 2011, the submarine also deployed as part of Operation CARIBBE. Corner Brook received a CDS commendation in 2008 for her operational excellence.

Corner Brook’s crew received the Operational Service Medal for the submarine’s successful participation in Operation CARIBBE in 2008 and 2011. These were the first operational medals received for service in Victoria-class submarines.

1 "Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Corner Brook (SSK 878)". Royal Canadian Navy. Government of Canada. 30 July 2014. Retrieved 1 October 2014
2. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 



HMCS CORNER BROOK Specs

Class and type: Upholder/Victoria-class submarine
Displacement:
2,185 long tons (2,220 t) surfaced
2,400 long tons (2,439 t) submerged
Length: 70.26 m (230 ft 6 in)
Beam: 7.6 m (24 ft 11 in)
Draught: 5.5 m (18 ft 1 in)
Propulsion:
Diesel-electric (37 MW (50,000 hp))
2 Paxman Valenta 16 RPA diesel generators, 4,070 hp (3,030 kW)
2 GEC, 5,000 kW (6,700 hp) motor-generators
Speed:
12 knots (14 mph; 22 km/h) surfaced
20 kn (23 mph; 37 km/h)+ submerged
Range: 10,000 nautical miles (19,000 km) at 12 knots (22 km/h)
Test depth: 200 m (660 ft)
Complement: 53 officers and crew
Armament:
6 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes
18 × Mark 48 torpedoes